Students Given Key Advice on Campus Health and Safety Day

On Wednesday 18 October, students at our Bulle campus were given valuable advice and information on safety. With the rise in car accidents in Switzerland, the increase in sexually transmitted diseases and various difficulties in health insurance abroad, students need to be aware of the threats and how to avoid them. The importance of striking a good work / life balance was also discussed, as well as ways to stay injury-free and improve productivity.

Staying healthy as a student

As a student, it can be easy to fall into bad habits. Whether it be succumbing to stress during exam season or suffering from a poor diet, there are many pitfalls students can face. Glion’s Health and Safety Day identified these issues, while providing vital help and feedback. Following on from the last health day, held in April, October’s event focused on safe driving, safe sex, safe travel and a healthy lifestyle. “We set up this day for a number of reasons,” said our Health Advisor, Ms Gilmore. “The number of car accidents in Switzerland, plus the information from Allianz that the number of STIs are increasing. Insurance cover while students are on internships or travelling is also another concern.”

In a survey, 30 per cent of students cited nutrition as a problem, with another day focusing on this matter scheduled for November. “We will dedicate a day entirely to this topic,” said Ms Gilmore. “A dietician will be present and a nutritionist will hold individual consultations. The Clinique La Prairie will present the role of nutrition in their SPA concept of health and long life.”

Gilmore says students need to keep organised to avoid illness. “Try not to pull too many all-nighters. Always ensure you have a good night’s sleep,” she said. “Physical exercise is also a good way to release some endorphins. Health and happiness are just as important as your academic success.”

Road safety

Glion’s security team delivered a drunk-drinking awareness exercise on campus. Students tested out a kart on a course specially designed to simulate the effects of drink driving. Wearing special glasses, the students were given an interactive experience. Glion’s Security Manager, Vasileios Boufidis, also provided some key tips for stopping anyone drunk from getting behind the wheel, whether it be calling for security or simply ensuring they get home in a taxi. Also present were local police, who ensured students’ foreign driving licenses were valid in Switzerland, guiding them to the process of changing them to Swiss ones if necessary.

Cyber crime awareness

Glion is taking drastic steps to ensure the online safety of our students. With cyber crime becoming more rampant, Vasileios provided some guidance. “Unfortunately hackers have become very creative and very powerful, making people vulnerable to attacks,” he said. “Students should always forego sharing public information on social media, and to reject friend requests from people that they do not know.

“We are working hard to keep students aware of possible dangers. Our messages are clear – do not experiment with illegal substances, speak up and do not overshare.”

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published.